Plaanid puhkusele minna? Võta endale majutus AirBnb kaudu ja saad 37€ kontoraha Tee konto Sulge
Facebook Like

Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus (0)

1 Hindamata
Punktid
 
Säutsu twitteris

 
 
 
    TRADERUN  MOODUL  
 
 TRADERUN  MODULE  
 
 
 
 
BUSINESS PECULIARITIES IN THE EU,  RUSSIA  AND  EASTERN  PARTNERSHIP COUNTRIES 
ÄRI ERIPÄRAD EUROOPA LIIDUS, VENEMAAL JA IDAPARTNERLUSRIIKIDES 
Lecturers: Ryhor Nizhnikau ( responsible ) Giorgi Gaganidze,  Sergei  Proskura, Andres Assor  
P2EC.00.202 (UT  code ), RIE 7044 (TLU code) 
 
Reading  materials: Business peculiarities in  Ukraine  and  Belarus  
 
Lugemismatejal: Äri eripärad Ukrainas ja Valgenenes 
 
 
Created by Andres Assor  
 
 
 
 
Tartu 2013
 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
 
INTRODUCTION  ................................................................................................................... 4 
1. 
UKRAINE ...................................................................................................................... 5 
1.1. 
General information ..................................................................................................... 5 
1.1.1. 
Country   Profile  ..................................................................................................... 5 
1.1.2. 
Post-Independent Ukraine. Economy  and politics  ............................................... 6 
1.1.3. 
Key Macroeconomic indicators ......................................................................... 14 
1.1.4. 
Foreign Direct Investments ................................................................................ 16 
1.1.5. 
Demographics and labor   force  .......................................................................... 17 
1.1.6. 
New  emerging  industry ....................................................................................... 19 
1.2. 
The Business Environment ........................................................................................ 23 
1.3. 
Banking  system.......................................................................................................... 27 
1.4. 
Starting a business in Ukraine ................................................................................... 32 
1.5. 
Market entry   strategies  .............................................................................................. 33 
1.5.1. 
Direct Sales  ........................................................................................................ 33 
1.5.2. 
Agency  and Commission arrangements ............................................................. 34 
1.5.3. 
Joint   venture with a Ukrainian partner .............................................................. 34 
1.5.4. 
Representative office (commercial and non-commercial) ................................. 34 
1.5.5. 
Ukrainian subsidiary .......................................................................................... 35 
1.6. 
Foreign investment treatment .................................................................................... 35 
1.7. 
Corporate forms  ......................................................................................................... 37 
1.8. 
Taxation  ..................................................................................................................... 39 
1.8.1. 
Corporate  income  tax (CIT) ............................................................................... 39 
1.8.2. 
Withholding Tax (WHT) ..................................................................................... 41 
1.8.3. 
Value  Added Tax (VAT) ...................................................................................... 42 
1.8.4. 
Transfer Pricing (TP) ......................................................................................... 43 
1.8.5. 
Personal taxation ............................................................................................... 44 
1.9. 
Financial Reporting ................................................................................................... 45 
1.10. 
Currency  regulations .............................................................................................. 46 
1.11. 
Risk of UAH devaluation ....................................................................................... 48 
2. 
BELARUS .....................................................................................................................51 
2.1. 
General information ................................................................................................... 51 
2.1.1. 
Country Profile ................................................................................................... 51 
2.1.2. 
Overview of Belarusian economy ....................................................................... 52 
2.2. 
Customs Union of Belarus, Russia  and Kazakhstan.................................................. 55 
2.3. 
The Business Environment ........................................................................................ 58 
2.4. 
Banking system.......................................................................................................... 59 
2.5. 
Development of Private  Sector  .................................................................................. 61 
2.5.1. 
Starting a business in Belarus ............................................................................ 63 
2.6. 
Foreign Investment treatment .................................................................................... 66 
2.7. 
Corporate forms ......................................................................................................... 71 
2.7.1. 
Limited Liability  Company ................................................................................. 72 
2.7.2. 
Joint- Stock  Company .......................................................................................... 73 
2.7.3. 
Private unitary enterprise .................................................................................. 74 
2.7.4. 
Registration of the  companies in Belarus .......................................................... 75 
2.8. 
Taxation ..................................................................................................................... 75 
2.8.1. 
Corporate income tax (CIT) ............................................................................... 75 
2.8.2. 
Withholding tax (WHT) ...................................................................................... 78 

2.8.3. 
Value Added Tax (VAT) ...................................................................................... 80 
2.8.4. 
Transfer Pricing (TP) ......................................................................................... 82 
2.8.5. 
Personal Taxation .............................................................................................. 82 
2.9. 
Financial Reporting ................................................................................................... 83 
2.10. 
Currency Regulations ............................................................................................. 86 
Appendix  1. Ukraine. Key macroeconomic  forecasts . ...........................................................89 
Appendix 2. Ukraine. Development of IT Outsourcing  industry - selected charts ..................90 
Appendix 3. Ukraine. Summary of Doing Business indicators...............................................92 
Appendix 4. Ukraine.  Chart  of withholding tax rates. ............................................................96 
Appendix 5. Belarus. Summary of Doing Business indicators. ..............................................99 
Appendix 6. Belarus. Chart of withholding tax rates. ........................................................... 103 
References ......................................................................................................................... 104 
ABOUT TRADERUN  PROGRAMME  .................................................................................. 106 
 

 
INTRODUCTION 
 
 
The  current  reading  material  focuses on business peculiarities in Ukraine and Belarus. 
 
 
*** 
 
The aim of the Traderun programme  course  “FUNDING  PROJECTS  IN RUSSIA AND EASTERN 
PARTNERSHIP  COUNTRIES”  
is  to   provide   the   students   with  comprehensive  and   practical  
overview of the fundraising possibilities in EU and Estonia. The course gives an overview of 
EU  structural   support   and  regional  implementing  agencies,  that  are   available   for  a 
businessman to  apply  for a fund. 
 
A successful  student  will be  aware  of and  understand  the EU fundraising possibilities in the 
frames  of  cooperation  with  Russian  and Eastern Partnership countries, and  able  to define the 
financing  criteria and priorities. 
 
The  current  reading   material   summarises  the  main  aspects  covered  by  lectures  and 
structurises the information channels for the future. 
 
The  course  supports  the   other   Traderun  courses,  especially  the  course   related   to  EU 
cooperation with Russia and Eastern Partnership Countries. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
1.  UKRAINE 
1.1. General information 
 
 
 
1.1.1.  Country Profile 
 
  Capital: Kyiv. 
   Total  area: 603,550 sq. km (the largest country in  Europe  by area that is physically  within  
Europe entirely). 
  Population: ~ 45 million (declining). 
   Major   cities  and   estimated   population  ( Good   news!  Not  all  the  business  and  capital 
concentrated in the capital): 
  Kyiv ( Kiev ) – 2.8 million,  
  Kharkiv (Kharkov) – 1.5 million,  
  Lviv ( Lvov ) - 1.5 million, 
  Donetsk – 1 million,  
  Dnipropetrovsk (Dnepropetrovsk) - 1 million,  
  Odesa (Odessa) – 1 million.  
  Zaporizhzhya (Zaporozhye) – 0.8 million. 

 
  GDP  growth , %: 1.0 (2013  forecast  EBRD – downward revision from previously projected 
2.5%).  
   Official    language :  Ukrainian  ( although   Russian  is  widely  used  in  business 
communication ). 
  Currency: Hryvnya (UAH). 
   Government  type:  republic
  Membership:  the  United  Nations,  the  International  Monetary  Fund  (IMF),  the  World 
Bank , the European Bank for  Reconstruction  and Development (EBRD), the World Trade 
Organization (WTO), etc. 
 
Ukraine  is  bordered  by  Russia  in  the   east ,  the   Black   Sea  in  the   south ,   Moldova ,  Romania, 
Hungary,   Slovakia   and   Poland   in  the   west ,  and  Belarus  in  the   north .  The  country  is   rich   in 
mineral  resources:  iron  ore,  coal , manganese, natural gas ( shale  – costly and   dangerous  to 
extract
),  oil,   sulfur ,  graphite,   titanium ,  magnesium,  kaolin,  nickel,   mercury ,  timber  and 
others
 
It’s  commonly   known   that  Ukraine  is  politically   divided    between   its   Western   and  Eastern 
regions .  Ukraine's  geography  and  history  have  played  an   important    role   in  the  country's 
current   political    crisis .  Western  parts  of  the  country  at   times   belonged  to  Poland,  Austro-
Hungary, and Czechoslovakia,  while  eastern and  southern  parts belonged to Russian  Empire
Only after World War II did Ukraine attain its  present  borders as a republic within the  Soviet  
Union.  That  history   partly   explains  Ukraine's  voting   patterns ,  political  sympathies,  and 
outlook  on the future.  
 
Population  of  Western  Ukraine  largely  supports  politics  paying  EU  card  (Yusteshenko, 
Tymoshenko),  while   industrial   Eastern  regions  support  Yanukovych  as  Politian  closely 
associated with better relation / integration with Russia.  
 
1.1.2.  Post-Independent Ukraine. Economy and politics 
 
1990-s 
 
When  Ukraine   became   independent  in  1991,   there   were   expectations   that  it  would  in  the 
near  future become a  wealthy free market  democracy  and a  full   member  of the European 
and Euro- Atlantic  communities. Ukraine  never  fulfilled those expectations. Instead, it is  seen  
as an underachiever, sometimes as a sick man of Europe, and  perhaps   even  as a potentially 
failed state thanks to its geopolitical situation, historical burdens, and the mistakes made in 
institutional development and  policy
 
Economically, Ukraine has  grown   along  with the  region . As  such , growth rates have not been 
low,  but  they   come   after  the  economically  devastating   1990s   and  are  not   built   on  a 

 
sustainable   foundation.  For   years   Russia   provided   Ukraine  with  underpriced  gas  while 
Ukraine’s   export   prices  increased  rapidly.  Over  the  decades  Ukraine,   however ,  grew 
dependent  on oil and gas  coming  from Russia, at  almost  no  costToday , 70  percent  of gas 
consumed in the country is imported.  
 
In  1991  Ukraine  was  one  of  the  poorest  Soviet  republics.  Statistics  for  the  time  are 
notoriously  uncertain,  but  the   best   ones  available  show  Ukraine’s  GDP  at  just  $1,307  per 
capita .  Only   Azerbaijan ,   Georgia ,  Kyrgyzstan,  Tajikistan,  and  Uzbekistan  lagged   behind  
Ukraine; even Moldova and Turkmenistan, generally regarded as very  poor  Soviet republics, 
were  ahead  of Ukraine. 
 
Ukraine’s  economy  contracted  annually  between  9.7  and  22.7  percent  in  1991–1996.  The 
country  experienced  hyperinflation  and  an  exceptionally  huge   production   decline  for  a 
country  not  ravaged  by  a  major  war.  Official  GDP  collapsed  by  almost   half   from  1990  to 
1994,  and   slow   decline  continued  throughout  the  decade.   Economic   growth  would  not 
resume   again   until  2000. The  budget  deficit was, at 14.4 percent of GDP, exceptionally large. 
Barter   and  the  use  of  surrogate  moneys  and  foreign  currencies   prevailed .  Ukraine  had 
introduced  a  sovereign  currency,  the  Hryvnia,  but  it  was   little   used.  A   shadow   economy 
swelled and compensated for an unknown  share  of the economic collapse. 
 
2001-2008 
 
Between 2001 and 2008, the Ukrainian economy picked up significantly. Many of Ukraine’s 
large- scale   capitalists—the  oligarchs—are   former   Soviet-era  industrial  managers  who 
succeeded  on  a  grand  scale  when  industries  were  privatized.  Their   wealth   was  originally 
based  on a  traditionalsimple   formulaconvert   cheap  energy and raw materials into  metals  
and manufactured  goods . The six richest Ukrainians are all metallurgy magnates. 
 
In Ukraine—like in Russia—incumbent managers (there is a  special   term  in Russian for such 
executives/ owners – Red  Director
) were present at the  birth  of private property and  could  
harness privatization. The political atmosphere of  nation   building  helped  keep   foreigners
Russians  and  Westerners  alike—mostly  out  of  the   game .  The  major  exception  was  the 
financial  system;   several    banks    both   from  the  West  and  the  East  have  entered  Ukrainian 
markets .  
 
Crucially  for  Ukraine’s  survival,  between  2001  and  2008,  as  metals  and   chemicals   prices 
boomed on the  back  of  fast  international economic growth while the  price  of gas imported 
from Russia remained low,  terms  of trade  improved  by 50 percent. Monetization also helped 
to drive this boom, as the  ratio  of  credit  to GDP grew extremely fast—from 7 to almost 80 
percent over just several years. 
 

 
In  less   than   a  decade,  Ukraine  leaped  from  an  economy  not  based  on   money   to   having   a 
banking  sector  comparable  in  relative   size   to  that  of  many  well- established   market 
economies .  Credit  was  at  last  available,  and  not  only  from  state-controlled  and  other 
politically connected banks, but from reputable foreign banks channeling  easy  international 
liquidity  to Ukraine as they did to other emerging economies. 
 
From 2000 to 2007, Ukraine’s  real  growth averaged 7.4 percent and was thus very  similar  to 
Russia’s. In both countries, this growth was driven by  domestic   demand : orientation  toward  
consumption ,  other  structural   change ,  and  financial  development.  In  Ukraine,  domestic 
demand  grew  in   constant   prices  by  almost  15  percent  annually.  It  was  supported  by 
expansionary—pro-cyclical—fiscal  policy  generally  driven  by  populism  for   perceived   short-
term political  gain
 
Further , industrial  capacity   left  idle in the 1990s was  brought  into use, capital inflows surged 
after  2005,  and  credit  growth  was  fueled  by   external   borrowing.  In  terms  of  markets,  in 
2000, the EU was  already  the largest, purchasing almost a third of Ukraine’s exports. It was 
followed  by  Russia  and   Asia ,  with  a  share  of  just  under  a   quarter   for  both.  In  2009,  Asia 
passed   the  EU,  but  together  they   still   accounted  for  55  percent  of  exports.  Fast- growing  
Asian   economies  are  now  the   basic   consumers  of  Ukrainian  metallurgy   products ,  and 
Russia’s exports of oil and gas suffer from low growth in Europe more than Ukraine’s exports 
do. 
 
Meanwhile , the price of gas remained low. In 2008, the price  paid  by Ukraine for gas was still 
less than half of that paid by Western European countries. Over a longer  period , this growth 
pattern was  bound  to be unsustainable. This is the most important  single   fact  of Ukraine’s 
economic prospects. The improving terms of trade of the 2000s were a  positive  windfall, but 
Ukraine  did  not   know   how  to  use  that  windfall  wisely.  Ukraine’s  economy  and  its  growth 
prospects ultimately suffered from its nationalism and inefficiency. 
 
The windfall Ukraine enjoyed meant that industry did not have to diversify or become more 
sophisticated—two  characteristics  that are  necessary  for  competition  in today’s markets. In 
2000, metals and mineral products accounted for half of Ukraine’s exports.  Adding  agro-food 
and  chemicals   took   the   proportion   to  just  over  70  percent.  In  2008,  the   shares   remained 
quite  similar, with agro-food increasing from 11 to 16 percent.  Steel  export  unit  value grew 
more  than   four   times  between  2000  and  2008,  while  steel  export   volume   grew  only  little 
between 2000 and 2004, and then stagnated. 
 
Missteps in Domestic Economy 
 
With  a  windfall  to  rely  on,  Ukraine  not  only  failed  to  diversify  its  exports  but  also 
mismanaged its domestic economy.  Since  1992 Ukraine has had just one  year , 2002, with a 

 
balanced budget. Income growth has been huge, and the ratio of domestic savings declined 
as consumption boomed. Since 2001 annual growth in  average  monthly earnings has always 
surpassed  consumer  price inflation, until 2008 quite frequently by more than 20 percentage 
points  and never much  below  that. Such income growth was supported by the country’s high 
export, especially steel, prices. 
 
Boosted by rapidly improving terms of trade,  import  volumes grew much faster than export 
volumes  and  the  net  growth  impact  of  foreign  trade  was   negative   by  some  5  percent 
annually. As imports were liberalized in the 1990s, consumers and investors alike  preferred  
the   superior    quality ,   choice ,  and   brands   available  from  world  markets.  By  the  2000s  an 
increasing  share  of   them   could  afford  foreign  goods.  Cheap  imports  from  Asian  and  other 
countries  also  became  available.  The  trade   balance   has  been  consistently  negative  since 
2005, and the current  account  has followed since 2006.  
 
Imports contribute to  welfare , but for that to be sustainable, any country also has to be able 
to  cover  the import bill with exports,  running  down reserves, inward investment (direct or 
other),  or  raising  foreign  credit.  But  exports,  of  course,  were  not   providing   the  necessary 
boost.  And  Ukraine had to   begin   with  in   practice   no  official  reserves or foreign   assets   and 
liabilities,  as  Russia  had  taken  responsibility  for  the  Soviet  bequest.  Ukraine  inherited  no 
assets  to  run  down.  And  no   reserve   funds  were  built  to   sustain   the  fiscal  situation  over  a 
longer term. Thus, Ukraine’s dependence on foreign,  usually  short-term, funding increased 
(which would  prove  dangerous in the 2008 crisis and will threaten Ukraine in the future as 
well). 
 
Net  inward  foreign  direct  investment  (FDI)  has  been  positive  since  1992,  varying  in  2005–
2010 between $5 and $10  billion  annually. But most foreign direct investment has  gone  to 
closed-sector   services   such  as  retail  trade  and   finance ,  while  the  industries  inherited  from 
the Soviet Union were privatized to domestic owners and are controlled by oligarchs.  These  
industries have  typically  failed to become more  competitive  in more than a decade. Major 
needs  for infrastructure investment have accumulated. 
 
In  contrast  to traditional industries, foreign entry into financial services was encouraged. Up 
to 40 percent of bank assets have been controlled by foreign entities, but the share is now 
declining  with  only  Russian  banks  penetrating  the  market.  Some  Western  banks  are 
downsizing their  activities , and a few at  least   wish  to  exit , if they only could  without  losing 
their past investments. 
 
In  spite  of  inevitably  worsening  demographics,  a  huge   pension   burden  was  created.  In  a 
nation of 46 million inhabitants, the pensions of 14 million pensioners grew from 9.2 percent 
of  GDP  in  2003  to  almost  18  percent  in  2009.  This  is  one  of  the  heaviest  pension  burdens 

 
globally,  and  negative  demographics  will   continue   to  worsen  the  situation  if  needed 
measures , like increasing the general pension age, are not taken. 
 
The end of cheap gas 
 
By the mid-2000s, Russia had reached several conclusions on energy and money that  started  
to rock Ukraine’s  position . The much-needed energy efficiency demanded a huge change in 
the   whole   of  economy  and  society—as  in  Ukraine—a   process   known  in  Russia  as 
modernization. 
 
The  first  necessary  condition  for modernization was to  raise  domestic gas and consequently 
power   prices.  A  roadmap  for  doing  that  was  accepted  in   late   2006,  and  an  evident 
conclusion   emerged.  If  Russians  had  to  pay  more,  there  was  no   reason   why  Belarusians, 
Ukrainians, and others should continue to be subsidized.  
 
The simple Russian  proposition  has had dramatic consequences for Ukraine. Ukraine’s terms 
of  trade  would  change  from  a  windfall  to  a  downpour  of  cold  rain.  And  Ukraine  had  not 
made the necessary domestic reforms to  prepare  for such a  turn  of  events .  
 
There have been aspiring political leaders who have thought that the Russian  decision  may 
be turned or at least postponed by playing on the Slavic or Eurasian Union cards: Ukrainians 
will  continue  to  entertain  prospects  of  Eastern  integration  if  Russia  continues  postponing 
inevitable  price  hikes.  Trying  to   avoid   the  price   revolution   is  surely  seen  by  some  inside 
Ukraine as a potent argument for  joining  post-Soviet reintegration schemes, like Belarus has 
done .  
 
Others  in  Kiev   found    virtue   in  necessity.  In  the  end  the  price  revolution  would   benefit  
Ukraine  by   making   long-postponed  reforms  inevitable.  Perhaps  as  well,  excessive 
dependence  on  Russia  could  be  minimized  by  developing   domestic   sources   of  energy,  like 
unconventional gas. Others took solace in the possibility that Ukraine’s export prices might 
in the end  increase  faster than those of Russia’s exports. 
 
Possibilities  for  the  future  have  been  explored,  but  meanwhile  populist  policies  have 
continued  unabated.  The  Yanukovych  government  has  refused  to  increase  gas  prices  for 
households, as demanded by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) as a key condition for 
continued financial support.  Waste  of energy by households thus continues unabated. There 
has also been no progress in reducing the burden posed by excessive pension expenditures 
on the budget—now and especially in the future.  
 
Debt  builds 
 

10 
 
Compounding this was the financial crisis that rocked the international economic system in 
2007–2008.  Ukraine’s   lack   of  sound  domestic  economic   structures   and  debt   accumulation  
made  it  especially  difficult  for  the  country  to  weather  the  financial  storm.  Gross  reserves 
have  grown  from  less  than  a   month ’s  imports  to  around   five   months’  worth from 2005 to 
2010, still a modest level. Public and private foreign debt has recently risen fast from more 
than  $10  billion  in  1997–2002  to  over  $100  billion  in  2008–2009.  The  2008  level  was  56.4 
percent of GDP and 118.7 percent of exports. 
 
In 2009, as GDP declined and the  UAH weakened, external debt stock was 91.5 percent of 
GDP and 191.6 percent of annual exports— clearly  an unsustainable level for Ukraine. In late 
2011,  Ukraine’s  official  reserves  were  some  $30  billion.  Paying  back  its  debt—barring  a 
further  accelerated  depletion  of  foreign   exchange   reserves—would  be   close   to  impossible 
without  fresh  foreign finance, preferably in the form of disbursements from the IMF. 
 
A two-year IMF  stand -by arrangement, put in  place  in 2008, provided exceptional  access  to 
financing  that  was   crucial   in  helping  Ukraine   through   the  Great  Recession.  In   particular ,  it 
helped  to   prevent   a  banking  crisis.  In  many  respects,  however,  Ukraine  reneged  on  its 
commitments,  and  the   program    went   off- track   very  soon,  as  a  2011  IMF  evaluation 
concludes.  This  holds  for  fiscal,  exchange   rate ,  and  monetary  policies,  but  in  particular  for 
the energy sector. 
 
 In  2008,  Ukraine  committed  itself  to phasing  out  all  gas  subsidies  in  three  years,  but little 
was done on that  front . For some  specific  industries, gas prices were actually decreased in 
2009. Ukrainian households still pay traditionally extremely little for the gas their  everyday  
life depends on. At end of the year, gas prices for households accounted for about one-fifth 
and those for  utilities  for one-third of import prices. Officially the low gas prices are justified 
as poverty alleviation, but it is difficult to imagine a less effective and less equitable pro-poor 
policy.  
 
The chart below illustrates dynamic  of gas prices in Ukraine – import vs household prices. 
11 
 
 
Source: Ukraine  Macro  Outlook for 2013 by UkrSibbank (BNP Paribas Group) 
 
Following  this, there was little left of  Ukraine’s credibility as a policy program partner. Yet, 
another   stand-by  arrangement  amounting  to  $15.3  billion  was  somewhat  surprisingly 
approved by the IMF on  July  28, 2010. 
 
2013 is extremely challenging year for Ukraine in terms of servicing its debt. The table below 
summarizes Ukraine’s FX (foreign currency) denominated debt repayment schedule for 2013 
is billion $. 
 
12 
 
 
Source: Ukraine Macro Outlook for 2013 by UkrSibbank (BNP Paribas Group) 
 
Not all bad news 
 
Ukraine could be a rich country. No other European country can boast its resources of coal, 
iron, gas, and rich agrarian  land . Almost three-quarters of its area is agricultural land, more 
than half arable. Though the quality of legendary black earth deteriorated  during  the Soviet 
decades, it remains  among  the best globally.  
 
The country has some oil and conventional gas, and perhaps more importantly, possesses as 
much  as  4  percent  of   global   coal  reserves.  Though  more  than  half  of  energy  consumed  is 
imported,  reserves  of  unconventional  gas  are  estimated  to  be  several  trillions  of  cubic 
meters  in  size,  promising  gas  independence  from  Russia  in  about  two  decades.  Indeed, 
Ukraine’s growth rate in 2001–2008, boosted by exceptional improvement in terms of trade, 
was fully comparable with Eurasian hydrocarbon  producers  at some 7 percent annually. 
 
Infrastructure  is  in  spite  of  deterioration  in  relatively  good   shape .  The  Soviet  Union  left 
industries,  for   instance   in  crucially  important  metallurgy,  that  are  generally  taken  to  be  in 
better condition than in Russia.  
 
Ukraine  was  a  potentially  rich  country  made  poor  by  a  tragic  history.  During  the  years 
following  independence,  Ukraine  has  grown  with  the  region,  but  relative  to  many 
expectations, this has been a bitter disappointment. Ukraine is seen as an underachiever. 
 
Source: 
http://carnegieendowment.org/2012/03/09/underachiever-ukraine-s-economy -
since-1991/a1nf# 
13 
 
 
1.1.3.  Key Macroeconomic indicators 
 
For Key Macroeconomic indicators and forecasts  please   refer  to Appendix 1. 
 
Ukraine’s  economic  sectors  are   diverse ,  but  in  need  of  new  capital  and  investments  to 
compete with sectors in the West. The country’s major export categories  include
  ferrous and non-ferrous metals,  
  steel products and steel structures;  
  chemical products ( including  fertilizers;  plastics  and  rubber );  
  agricultural products and food (mainly  grains , cereals; food  processing  and packaging).  
 
As  seen  from  the  list   above ,  Ukrainian  economy  is  strongly  dependent  on  various 
commodities  and  as   result   of  price  fluctuations  of  those  commodities.  Perhaps,  the  only 
commodity group, which is in long-run  rather  immune (not 100% though) to cyclical  changes  
are  agricultural  products.   Taking   into  account  growing  population   worldwide   and  gradual 
income  growth,  particularly  in  food  importing  Asia  and   Africa ,  it’s  rather   safe   assumption 
that demand and prices for agricultural products will continue upwards trend. Ukraine with 
Europe’s  best  and  largest   areas   for   agriculture   is  very  well  positioned  to  benefit  from  the 
World’s growing demand for food.  
 
Other  commodities  exported  by  Ukraine  (such  as  steel,  coal,  chemicals  etc)  are  and  will 
continue to be  affected  by cycles of the global economy  – there will be periods of growing 
demand and prices hikes as well as periods of  slowing  demand and declining price.  
 
Ukraine’s dependence on energy supplies and the lack of significant structural reform have 
made the Ukrainian economy vulnerable to external shocks. Ukraine depends on imports to 
meet about 75% of its annual oil and natural gas  requirements  and 100% of its  nuclear  fuel 
needs.  
 
The  strong  correlation between world commodity prices and Ukraine’s economic growth can 
be seen in  Figure  below. 
 
14 
 
 
 
drop  in steel prices - Ukraine’s top export - and Ukraine’s exposure to the global financial 
crisis because of  aggressive  foreign borrowing lowered the GDP growth rate in 2008.  
Ukraine reached an agreement with the IMF for a USD 16.4 billion Stand-By Arrangement in 
November  2008  to  deal  with  the  economic  crisis,  but  the  program  quickly  stalled  because 
little progress  was  made  in  implementing  reforms.  The  economy  contracted   nearly   15%  in 
2009 - one of the worst economic performances in the world.  
 
In  April  2010,  Ukraine  negotiated  a  price  discount  on  Russian  gas  imports  in  exchange  for 
extending Russia’s  lease  on its  naval   base  in Crimea. In August 2010, Ukraine reached a new 
agreement with the IMF for a USD 15.1 billion Stand-By Agreement to put the country on the 
path   to  fiscal  sustainability,  reform  the  gas  sector,  and   shore   up  the  country’s  banking 
system.  Economic  growth  resumed  in  2010  and  2011,  buoyed  by  exports.  After  initial 
disbursements,  the  IMF  program  stalled  in   early   2011  due  to  the  lack  of  progress  in 
implementing  key  gas  sector  reforms,  namely  gas  tariff   increases   (obviously  politically  very 
unpopular measure
).  
 
Agriculture   fell   to  9.3%  of  the  total  GDP  in  2011  compared  with  14%  in  1999.  Industry, 
including   mining ,   manufacturing   and   construction ,  continued  to  account  for  34.7%  in  this 
period. Meanwhile, trade and other services grew from 51 to 56.1 percent.  
 
15 
 
1.1.4.  Foreign Direct Investments 
 
Despite having huge potential, Ukrainian economy is critically lacking in foreign investments. 
Percentage of FDI to GDP was declining very year since 2007 and, according to BNP Paribas 
in Ukraine forecast, projected to continue declining during 2013-2104. 
 
According to State Statistics  Service  of Ukraine, foreign direct investment (FDI) in a form of 
equity capital slowed substantially in 2012. FDI for the period of  January  – September 2012 
(3 quarters) amounted to USD 2.6 billion, which was 29.4% down year of a year.  
 
Investments  came  from 129 countries and regions. The ten largest  investor  countries, which 
account for over 82% of total FDI, are Cyprus with $15.076 billion in investment,  Germany  
with $7.4 billion, the  Netherlands  with $5.04 billion, Russia with $3.71 billion,  Austria with 
$3.3 billion, the United Kingdom with $2.4 billion, the  British  Virgin  Islands  with $1.81 billion, 
France  with $1.8 billion,  Sweden  with $1.58 billion, and Switzerland with $1.09 billion. 
 
Industrial  enterprises   received  $16.866 billion in investment, which was 32% of total FID in 
Ukraine. In particular, $13.936 billion was  invested  in the processing industry $1.51 billion in 
the  production  and  distribution  of  electricity  and  gas,  and  the  water   supply ,  and  $1.424 
billion in the mining industry. 
 
In the processing industry the investment was  split  in the following way: the  manufacture  of 
basic  metals  and  fabricated  metalware  received  $6.137  billion  in  direct  investment,  the 
production of food,  beverages  and tobacco got $2.995 billion, chemical and petrochemical 
industry  $1.321  billion,   engineering   $1.156  billion,  while  the  manufacture  of  other  non-
metallic mineral products $1.013 billion. 
 
Financial  institutions  accumulated $15.702 billion in direct investment, which was 29.8% of 
total  amount
 
A  total  of  $8.523  billion,  or  16.2%  of  total  FDI,  was  invested  in   organizations   that  are 
engaged  in  transactions  with  real   estate ,  rent  and  leasing,  engineering,  and  services  to 
individuals,  while  $5.503  billion,  or  10.4%,  was  invested  in  enterprises  engaged  in  trade, 
repairs of motor vehicles, household and personal goods. 
 
Total  foreign  direct  investment  (equity  and  debt   instruments )  as  of  October  1,  2012  was 
$6.252 billion. 
 
The amount of direct investment (equity) from Ukraine in other countries as of October 1, 
2012  was  $6.428  billion,  in  particular,  EU  countries  received  $6.027  billion  (93.7%  of  total 
amount),  the  CIS  countries  $306  million  (4.8%),  and  other  countries  $95  million  (1.5%). 
16 
 
Direct  investment  from  Ukraine  went  to  47  countries,  the   lion ’s  share   going   to  Cyprus 
(90.4%). Total direct investment (equity and debt instruments) by Ukraine in other countries 
as of October 1, 2012, amounted to $6.652 billion. 
Source: The American  Chamber  of Commerce in Ukraine 
 
The  European  Bank  for  Reconstruction  and  Development  continues  to  be  the  largest 
financial investor in Ukraine. As of January 1, 2013 the Bank has committed more than EUR 
8.2  billion (USD  10.7  billion)  in  318  projects.  In  2012,  the  EBRD  has  invested EUR  934 
80% sisust ei kuvatud. Kogu dokumendi sisu näed kui laed faili alla
Vasakule Paremale
Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #1 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #2 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #3 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #4 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #5 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #6 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #7 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #8 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #9 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #10 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #11 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #12 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #13 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #14 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #15 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #16 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #17 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #18 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #19 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #20 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #21 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #22 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #23 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #24 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #25 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #26 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #27 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #28 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #29 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #30 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #31 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #32 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #33 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #34 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #35 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #36 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #37 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #38 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #39 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #40 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #41 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #42 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #43 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #44 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #45 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #46 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #47 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #48 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #49 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #50 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #51 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #52 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #53 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #54 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #55 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #56 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #57 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #58 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #59 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #60 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #61 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #62 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #63 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #64 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #65 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #66 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #67 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #68 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #69 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #70 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #71 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #72 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #73 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #74 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #75 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #76 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #77 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #78 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #79 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #80 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #81 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #82 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #83 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #84 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #85 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #86 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #87 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #88 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #89 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #90 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #91 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #92 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #93 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #94 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #95 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #96 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #97 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #98 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #99 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #100 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #101 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #102 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #103 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #104 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #105 Business peciliarities in Ukraine and Bealrus #106
Punktid 50 punkti Autor soovib selle materjali allalaadimise eest saada 50 punkti.
Leheküljed ~ 106 lehte Lehekülgede arv dokumendis
Aeg2014-04-25 Kuupäev, millal dokument üles laeti
Allalaadimisi 4 laadimist Kokku alla laetud
Kommentaarid 0 arvamust Teiste kasutajate poolt lisatud kommentaarid
Autor 21aastat Õppematerjali autor

Mõisted


Meedia

Kommentaarid (0)

Kommentaarid sellele materjalile puuduvad. Ole esimene ja kommenteeri


Sarnased materjalid

55
pdf
Business peculiarities in Russia
133
pdf
Investors Handbook-A Legal Guide to Business in Georgia
574
pdf
The 4-Hour Body - An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat-Loss-Incredible Sex-and Becoming Superhuman - Timothy Ferriss
1168
pdf
Liha töötlemine
904
pdf
Christopher Vogler The Writers Journey
278
doc
ESTONIAN SYMPHONIC MUSIC-THE FIRST CENTURY 1896-1996
580
pdf
CHANGE YOUR THINKING CHANGE YOUR LIFE
368
pdf
GETTING TO KNOW THE TOEFL





Faili allalaadimiseks, pead sisse logima
Kasutajanimi / Email
Parool

Unustasid parooli?

UUTELE LIITUJATELE KONTO MOBIILIGA AKTIVEERIMISEL +50 PUNKTI !
Pole kasutajat?

Tee tasuta konto

Sellel veebilehel kasutatakse küpsiseid. Kasutamist jätkates nõustute küpsiste ja veebilehe üldtingimustega Nõustun