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Kategooria british history (suurbritannia ajalugu) - 42 õppematerjali

Ajalugu >> British history (suurbritannia ajalugu)
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British History KT küsimused ja vastused

How many public holidays or Red-Letter Days are there in Britain? Name them. 8 public holidays in Britain: two at Christmas, one for the New Year(which was only introduced in the late 1970s) two at Easter and three Bank Holidays. 2. What is the same and what is different about the way Christmas is celebrated in England and Estonia? In England, there's common to sing Carol's and for children, Christmas means pantomimes ­ plays based on fairy tales which combine comedy, dance and song. A traditional Christmas dinner includes roast turkey with roast potatoes, a range of vegetables, cranberry sauce etc., followed by Christmas pudding and Christmas cake. The pulling of crackers(and the wearing of paper hats) before the meal is quite popular. Afterwards many watch the Queen's traditional Christmas address on TV at 3 pm. Christmas actually contains of 3 days: Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Boxing Day. The...

British history (suurbritannia... - Keskkool
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Part of british history

1.The leg of norm-when william 1 died normandy went to his oldest son robert,feudalism-land was given to lords who suported The domesday book-the first national census,11h 2.Anglo sax 410-793 wrom the jutes came from juteland,angles from south of denma, saxons from germ; deff-the new anglo saxon invaders were not organised centrally as the romans had been;days of the week 3.The celtic peop 500bc-43ad the cealts(fr) the brit(eng)the graels(irel) 4.Roman britain ad 43-410 britains helped the cauls fight against julius ceasar 5.the vihing793-1066 they came acress the north seam most viking who sailed overses were simply searching for letters land for their farms.alfred great ­the eng king, king canute 1016 of denmark captured the english ...

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History of London 2

12: What was a common way to punish criminals during this time and how was it done? Penalties for crime were harsh, with the death penalty being applied for fairly minor crimes. Public hangings were common in London, and were popular public events. The death sentence could be passed for picking pockets, stealing bread or cutting down a tree. Minor crime was punished by being sent to prisons, sometimes transported abroad for theft, whipped in public. 13: What was the second bridge to be built over the Thames and when was it built? In 1750 Westminster Bridge was opened, and, for the first time in history, London Bridge, in a sense, had a rival. 14: How much did the population of London grow from 1800 to 1900? Its population expanded from 1 million in 1800 to 6.7 million a century later. 15: What was London's rank in the world during the 19th century? London was the largest city in the world until it was beaten by New York in 1925. 16: Which 2 cities challenged its dominance towards the end of the 19th century? Paris and New York 17: Which famous writer wrote about London's poor (Oliver Twist)? Charles Dickens 18: When were the Metropolitan Police established and what were their two nicknames? In 1829 and the force gained the nickname of "bobbies" or "peelers" named after Robert Peel. 19: When did the first railway to be built in London open? The first railway to be built in London was the London and Greenwich Railway a short line from London Bridge to Greenwich, which opened in 1836. 20: What effects did the railways have on...

British history (suurbritannia... - Keskkool
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The Importance of English History

The Importance of English History Essay There is not a single country in the world without a history ­ it can be either long or short, yet still a unique part of the existence. England has had many colourful events throughout the history, but some have dominated over the others and therefore all together formed a country we can see nowadays: the Great Britain. Starting from the beginning, Britain was part of the mainland until about 6000 BC, when it became an island. Ever since then it has been developing slightly different from the other part of the Europe. For example, when two parts separated, some animals had already adopted the life on the island and did not move back to the mainland. They suited their appearance more comfortable for the isolated island and learned how to survive in the wet climate and rather heavy air. The first inhabitants ­ the Iberians ­ also h...

British history (suurbritannia... - Keskkool
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FOLKLORE

l kl o re Fo di t i on r al tra O Folk lo elem re can ents c the , it e ontain r s e ever ometim qually c ligious y e o o prac day life s mund ncerns r mythi n t . a it c narr ical an Folklore ne tra self wit io a d t freq d h conf tive pa he es uent itions o...

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Population

they have brought with them their languages, cultures and religions. The most widely spoken minority languages today are from the Asian subcontinent, the other languages include Italian, Spanish, Greek, Turkish and Chinese. The largest ethnic minorities are of Caribbean or African descent (1.2 million), Indians (1.6 million), Pakistani (1 million) and Bangladeshi (0.5 million). 2. Age breakdown In common with most countries in Western Europe, Britain has an ageing population. Under 15 years of age 18% 15-64 years of age 66.3% 65 years of age and over 15.7% The proportion of population of pensionable age is increasing. People are living longer. Their life expectancy at birth is over 70 years in the developed world (improvement in health care, medicines and people's diets). The ethnic minority population has a younger age structure than the white population. Why British not English? Many foreigners say "England" and "English" when they mean "Britain", or the "UK", and "British". This is very annoying for the 5 million people who live in Scotland (the Scottish), the 2.8 million people in Wales (the Welsh) and 1.5 million in Northern Ireland (the Irish) who are certainly not English. However, the people from Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and England are all British. What makes the Scottish, Welsh, English and Northern Irish different from each other? About 2,000 years ago the British Isles were inhabited by the Celts who originally came from continental Europe. During the next 1,000 years there were many invasions: the Romans from Italy, the Angles and Saxons from Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands, the Vikings from Denmark and Norway, and the Normans from France. These invasions drove the Celts into what is now Wales and Scotland, and they remained, of course, in Ireland. The English, on the...

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Stonehenge - lühikokkuvõte inglise keeles

STONEHENGE Stonehenge is surely Britain's greatest national icon, symbolizing mystery, power and endurance. Its original purpose is unclear to us, but some...

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The Saxons & Vikings

British landlords ruled small, unstable kingdoms and continued some Roman traditions of governance. In the mid-5th cent, Vertigern, a British leader, hired Germanic mercenaries to help defend against peoples of the north (Picts & Scots). In the end they revolted & the process of invasion and settlement began. The first Saxon ,,kings" were Hengist & Horsa in Kent, Aelle in Sussex, Cerdic Cynric in Wessex. So the first ,,English" became mainly from Northern Germany & Denmark. The resistance of the Celts was long. They were free at the time, not like other Roman provinces on the Continent. Around 500, the Britons seem to have won several victories. One of their leaders was Ambrosius Aurelianus and one of their victories was at the place called Mount Badon. The main leader of the Britons at this time may have been the warri...

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The Middle Ages

One of the most important kings in the Middle Ages. He had lands in Britain & France. Then the government was the monarch, a person, not a place. He had more land than any pervious king. After his marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine, he also ruled the lands south of Anjou. His empire stretched from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees. England provided most of its wealth, but the heart was Anjou. Henry II began to regain royal control. During the war some barons had become very powerful. He pulled down some of their castles. He tried to restore law & order. He wanted the same kind of justice to be used everywhere. He appointed his own judges to travel around the country. They dealt with crimes & disagreements over poverty. Serious offences were tried in the king's court. At first they had no special knowledge or training. They were trusted to use common sense...

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The Middle Ages

They were forbidden to travel without their lords permission. Evolution of Parliament, the Model Parliament The Model Parliament is the English parliament set up in 1295 by Edward I. It was the first Parliament to include representatives from outside the clergy and aristocracy, and was established because Edward needed the support of the whole country against his opponents: Wales, France, and Scotland. Independence of Scotland The first time Scotland got to be independent was after the First Scottish War of Independence. The First War of Scottish Independence started in 1296 by the English invasion of Scotland. The First Independence war ended with de jure restoration of Scottish independence with the Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton in 1328. Scotland's de facto independence had been restored in 1314 at the Battle of Bannockburn. Signing of the Magna Carta Magna Carta is a British document, which was signed by King John in 1215. It reaffirmed long-standing rights and responsibilities of the English nobility; limited the powers of the king; and recognized that all people, including the government and monarch, are subject to the law. Peasants' Revolt The Peasants' Revolt of 1381 is one of the most dramatic events of English history. It began as a local revolt in Essex and quickly spread across much of the south east of England. The causes of the Peasants Revolt: No peasants could be paid more than the wages paid in 1346. No lord or master should offer more wages than paid in 1346. No peasants could leave the village they belonged to. On June 14th, the king met the rebels at Mile End. At this meeting, Richard II gave the peasants all that they asked for and asked that they go home in peace. Some did. Others returned to the city and murdered the archbishop and Treasurer - their heads were cut off on Tower...

British history (suurbritannia... - Keskkool
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Taimerakk, Loomarakk

Pool läbilaskev membraan, raku elus osa. Tagab rakule keemilise koostise püsivuse. Rakumembraan koosneb: * Fosfolipiididest, *Valkudest, * Oligosahhariididest Rakumembraani ülesanded: 1. Membraanid piiritlevad rakku, kaitsevad kahjulike mõjude eest, muudavad kuju, suurendavad raku sisepinda. 2. Membraanid kindlustavad rakkude vaheliste seoste tekke 3. Memb. Retseptrodi on komplentsete bioaktiivsete ainete(hormoonide) suhtes. 4. Memb. Tagotsütoosi ja pinotsütoosi võime ( tahkeid osakesi väliskeskkonnast, vedelaid osakesi vee tilgakesi) *Tagotsütoos ­ määrab immuun ja kaitse süsteemi tugevuse. 5. Memb. Asuvad ensüümid ja ensüümide kopleksid, mis 1. kindlustavad ainete transpordi, 2. Samaaegsete ainete biokeemilise muundumise. Rakuorganell ­ raku osa, mis täidab rakus kindlat ülesann...

British history (suurbritannia... - Keskkool
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Agriculture

However, the sector's role in the economy is much smaller than in most other major industrial countries, in terms of employment and contribution to GDP, reflecting Britain's early industrialization. Agriculture employs less than 2 per cent of the population and contributes 2 per cent of GDP. However, it achieves high levels of efficiency and productivity. Britain is self-sufficient in 58 per cent of all types of food and animal feed. Large parts of Britain, notably in Scotland and Wales, are suitable only for grazing. Overall, in the first half of the 1990s about 39 per cent of agricultural land was under pasture, another 27 per cent under rough grazing, and the remainder under crops or lying fallow. Over half of all full-time farms are devoted to dairy or beef farming, or sheep. Cattle and sheep contri...

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R. Kipling & M. Faraday

He was born on 30 December 1865 in Bombay, in India which was part of the British Empire then. he is best known for his works of fiction The Jungle Book (1894) (a collection of stories which includes Rikki-Tikki-Tavi), Kim (1901) (a tale of adventure), many short stories, including The Man Who Would Be King (1888); and his poems, including Mandalay (1890), Gunga Din (1890), and If-- (1910).He is regarded as a major "innovator in the art of the short story"; his children's books are enduring classics of children's literature; and his best works speak to a versatile and luminous narrative gift. Kipling was one of the most popular writers in English, in both prose and verse, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In 1907, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, making him the first English language writer to receive the prize. Among other honours, he was sounded out for the British Poet Laureateship and on...

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The Great Plague of London

The Great Fire of London. Samuel Pepys's diary . The Great Plague of London (1665-1666) The Great Plague was a massive outbreak of disease in England that killed an estimated 100,000 people The plague arrived with a merchant carrying a parcel of cloth sent from London, although this is a disputed fact It was the last major outbreak of the plague in England The English outbreak is thought to have originated from the Netherlands By July 1665, plague was in the city of London itself Though concentrated in London, the outbreak affected other areas of the country A bill of mortality for the plague People at the plague King Charles II of England, his family and his court left the city for Oxfordshire The aldermen and the the majority of the other city authorities opted to stay at their posts - The Lord Mayor of the city, Sir John Lawrence quarantined himself in a sp...

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Edward the Confessor & Westminster Abbey

Edward the Confessor (1003-1066) Edward was the oldest son of Ethelred II (Ethelred the Unready http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethelred_the_Unready) and Emma of Normandy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emma_of_Normandy). He wast he penultimate Anglo-Saxon king of England. The family was exiled in Normandy after the Danish invasion of 1013 so Edward spent the first part of his life in Normandy. He grew up in deep religious views and gained the nickname ''Confessor''. As Edward was seperated from his family and grew up in a strange land, it is said that his childhood wasn't a happy one. After Ethelred's death in 1016 the Danes again took control of England. The...

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Celts and Romans

lühikonspekt keltidest ja roomlastest...

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The Norman Conquest

The Norman Conquest William I (the Conqueror) (1066 - 1087) On October 14, in the fateful Battle of Hastings, William defeated and killed Harold and seized the English throne. Two months after the Battle of Hastings, William I was crowned king in Westminster Abbey. The service was held on Christmas Day 1066, with all the traditional ceremonies associated with the coronation of English kings since the time of Edgar. William had gained his throne by accepting the English form of coronation, William emphasised his claim to be legitimate successor to Edward the Confessor. William I was a strong king and a man of immense determination. He was stern to people who opposed his will, but kindly disposed to those who did not. William saw England as an extension of his French domains. He dispossessed nearly all the Anglo-Saxon nobles of their lands, and put Normans in their places. These men discouraged rebellion by building strong cas...

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Anglo-Saxons

lühikonspekt anglosaksidest...

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Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian's Wall Hadrian's Wall was a stone and turf fortification built by the Roman Empire across the width of Great Britain to prevent military raids by the tribes of Scotland to the north, to improve economic stability and provide peaceful conditions in the Roman province of Britannia to the south, to physically mark the frontier of the Empire, and to separate the unruly Selgovae tribe in the north from the Brigantes in the south and discourage them from uniting. The name is also sometimes used jocularly as a synonym for the border between Scotland and England, although for most of its length the wall follows a line well south of the modern border -- and neither the Scoti tribe nor the English lived in Britain at the time of the wall's construction. The wall was the northern border of the Empire in Britain for much of the Roman Empire's rule, and also the most heavily fortified border in the Empire. In addition to its use as a militar...

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Countrystudy Summary

Country Study Mari-Liis Luukas 11c The British Isles Administrative d'mnstrtv haldus- Self-governing self'gvn isemajandav, iseseisev Legislative assembly 'ledsltv 'sembl seadusandlik kogu The British Isles is the name of a group of islands washed by the North Sea in the east and the Atlantic Ocean in the west....

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