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Kategooria british culture (briti kultuur) - 39 õppematerjali

Keeled >> British culture (briti kultuur)
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British culture

STRANGE BRITISH TRADITIONS BOG SNORKELING The world's premier Bog Snorkeling event is held in August each year in Powys, Wales. The first World Bog Snorkeling Championship held in 1985. Basically participants dive into a bog, wearing goggles, a pair of flippers and a snorkel, they then proceed to race each other along a 120ft trench filled with mud. Goggles ­ Kaitseprillid. Participants ­ Osalejad. Bog ­ Raba/soo. Flippers ­ Ujumislestad. Snorkel ­ Hingamistoru. Trench - Kraav PANCAKE RACING Olney's famous race is run every Shrove Tuesday, featuring women who have lived in the town for more than 6 months. It dates back to 1445 and it is believed all began with a townswoman late for the Shriving service at the Olney parish church. She heard the church bells ring out for the service and she fled her house fearful of being late. She ran the distance down the High Street to make it to the pari...

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BRITISH NATIONAL SYMBOLS

2 INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................................3 1. BRITISH NATIONAL SYMBOLS..............................................................................................5 1.1 Great Britain and British story................................................................................................5 1.2 National Symbols and Nation Building..................................................................................5 1.3 The Use of Flags throughout History.....................................................................................6 1.4 The Early Modern Flags. United Kindom: Union Jack...

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British famous writers

f am o us writ er s British (1 9 0 0- 19 97 ) r itc he t t Victor Sawdon P · writer and critic · short stories · 1920 1930 was writing newspapers and reviews for different papers · knighted in 1975 · President of the worldwide association of writers · 40 books ( 190 3 197 3 ) lom e r William P · novelist, poet and literary editor · educated in United Kingdom, but described himself as a AngloAfricanAsian · first novels · after several years went to Japan and after that to England · 30 books ...

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Geography and climate/weather

the second thing that pops into my mind the weather and how they talk and complain that the weather is bad and it is raining, The weather in the UK is actually changeable and it doesn't rain all the time They are in the Temperate climate zone and the Gulf stream affect their weather. so there are no extreme weather conditions Much of the land in England is low lying. forming meadows and pastures Upland areas are generally confined to northern England The Pennines are a range of mountains and hills in Northern England The Midlands' largest city is Burmingan.. It is one of England’s principal industrial and commercial areas. The highest point of the UK is Ben Nevis which is located in Scotland and the longest river in the UK is the Severn which begins in Wales. Scotland and Wales are the most mountainous parts of t...

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Summary Education

For example they have go to school 2 years earlier than us. Primary school is for pupils aged 5-11. Though schooling is only compulsory from age 5 in the UK, children most commonly enter Reception Class aged 4 in the academic year in which they will reach their 5th birthday. When pupils are aged 7 they sit Key Stage 1 [SATs]. Key Stage 2 SATs are taken when pupils are aged 11. Secondary school is for pupils aged 11-16. 11-13 years old pupils study a broad range of 10–15 subjects. No public examinations are taken during this time. Traditionally, at the age of 14 students start a programme that lasts for 2 years and during which time they study up to 11 subjects of their choice. After this students take GCSE state examinations After 16 attending at school isn't compulsory but pupils can stay at school, go to colleg...

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Nimetu

My Dreamland United States of America Facts Capital: Washington D.C. Largest City: New York City President: Barack Obama Population over 300 million 50 States Location Famous person Barack Obama George Washington Michael Jordan Neil Armstrong Al Capone Walt Disney Thomas Alva Edison Henry Ford Elvis Presley Famous places Rocky Mountain Devils Tower Crook County, Wyoming Niagara Falls Las Vegas Main reason why I want to go there: Gorgeous views Great Buildings Lots of to see and watch ...

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Ringo Starr

Ringo Starr * He joined The Beatles in 1962, taking over Pete Best. * Before he played in The Beatles, he played in another Liverpool groups, for example Rory Storm and Hurricanes. DRUMS, RINGO USED IN THE BEATLES: *Ludwig Super Classic Drumset *Ludwig Black Oyster Pearl Drumset Ringo Starr Lead singer of many Beatles songs: Yellow Submarine With a Little Help from My Friends Songwriter of two Beatles songs: Don't Pass Me By Octopus's Garden Ringo Starr * After The Beatles broke up in 1970, he started his solo career. * At the same year released two album. "Sentimental Journey" and "Beaucoups Blues". * The successfullest project was the album "Ringo" in 1973 (Hit singles "Photograph" and "You're Sixteen" came from the album. A music example:Ri...

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Dialects of English

Europe Great Britain (British English) · Black British English · England (English language in England) o Northern Cheshire Cumbrian (Cumbria including Barrow-in-Furness) Geordie (Newcastle upon Tyne) Lancastrian (Lancashire) Scouse (Merseyside) Mancunian-Salfordian (Manchester & Salford) Mackem (Sunderland) Northumbrian (rural Northumberland) Pitmatic (Durham and Northumberland) Yorkshire (also known as Tyke) In the far north, local speech is noticeably Scots in nature. o East Midlands o West Midlands Black Country English Brummie (Birmingham) Potteries (north Staffordshire)...

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Trafalgar Square

With its position in the heart of London, it is a tourist attraction, and one of the most famous squares in the United Kingdom and the world. At its centre is Nelson's Column, which is guarded by four lion statues at its base. Statues and sculptures are on display in the square, including a fourth plinth displaying changing pieces of contemporary art, and it is a site of political demonstrations. The name commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar (1805), a British naval victory of the Napoleonic Wars. The original name was to have been "King William the Fourth's Square", but George Ledwell Taylor suggested the name "Trafalgar Square". The northern area of the square had been the site of the King's Mews since the time of Edward I, while the southern end was the original Charing Cross, where the Strand from the City met Whitehall, coming north from Westminster. As the midpoint between these twin cities, Charing Cross is to this day considered the heart of London, from which all distances are measured. In the 1820s the Prince Regent engaged the landscape architect John Nash to redevelop the area. Nash cleared the square as part of his Charing Cross Improvement Scheme. The present architecture of the square is due to Sir Charles Barry and was completed in 1845. Trafalgar Square is owned by the Queen in Right of the Crown, and managed by the Greater London Authority.[1] Trafalgar Square ranks as...

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Summary of Tower Bridge

It is close to the Tower of London, which gives it its name. It has become an iconic symbol of London. The bridge consists of two towers which are tied together at the upper level by means of two horizontal walkways which are designed to withstand the horizontal forces exerted by the suspended sections of the bridge on the landward sides of the towers. The vertical component of the forces in the suspended sections and the vertical reactions of the two walkways are carried by the two robust towers. The bascule pivots and operating machinery are housed in the base of each tower. The bridge's present colour dates from 1977 when it was painted red, white and blue for the Queen's Silver Jubilee. Originally it was painted a chocolate brown colour. The Tower Bridge in London remains one of the more popular tourist attractions in the city. In 1982,...

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Daniel Radcliffe Presentation

Daniel Radcliffe Heleri Järve 10.H Beginning of his life · Born in July 23, 1989 · Born in West London , England · An only child · Wanted to be and actor at 5 Career · Got the part of Harry Potter in 2000 · Has played the lead actor in Harry Potter for all seven movies · Has received multiple awards for his performances in movies Intresting facts · Enjoys playing cricket · One of the youngest, richest people in the World · A fan of punk rock music · Writes poetry · Gives a lot of his money to charities Thank you for listening! ...

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Presentation about Scotland National Symbols

Andrew's Cross · from the 12 th century · blue background over which is placed a white representation of an X-shaped cross · 'Royal Flag' of Scotland or the 'Rampant Lion' · red lion on a gold field · Scottish monarchs or government officials · by William the Lyon in 1165 FLOWER · thistle · prickly-leaved purple flower · 15th century · symbol of defence · Scottish Bluebell FLOWER OF SCOTLAND · there is no official National anthem of Scotland · Scottish song, used frequently at special occasions and sporting events. · written by Roy Williamson · presented in 1967 · refers to the victory of the Scots Robert the Bruce NATIONAL DAY · St Andrew's Day · St Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland · 30 November · In 2006- an official bank holiday REFERENCES · http://www.wor...

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Theatre vocabulary I, II

mere entertainment Low-brow, middle-brow, highbrow Performing arts Visual arts THEATRE Types of theatres: · Civic theatres · Regional theatres Types of plays: · Tragedy · Comedy · Tragi-comedy · Farce · Drama · Historical drama/play · Thriller · Musical (comedy) Types of tickets: · Regular · Returns · Standing tickets · Complementary tickets · House seats · Production/performance · Audition · Repertory/repertoire · Part ­ role · lines · Rehearse · Rehearsal · dress rehearsal · Preview · First night · premiere · Matinee · Appear in a play · The main part/the leading part/the lead · Supporting part/supporting role · A bit part · A speaking part · A walking-on part · The understudy · A cameo role · To learn the part/to look the part; · a mega...

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Theatre vocabulary III

· A director ­ responsible for the artistic side of the performance; · A producer ­ responsible for financial side of the performance; · A manager ­ responsible for administrative side of the performance; · A designer (costume, stage, light/lighting) ­ someone whose job is to make plans or patterns for clothes, furniture, equipment etc. · A theatre buff ­ a person who loves the theatre and goes there a lot; · An impresario (also called an agent) ­ has to find parts to an actor/actress; · stagehand ­ a person who moves properties, regulates lighting, etc. in a theatrical production; · `bite lights' ­ small flashlight held between the teeth, leaving hands free to work; · Spotlight - (a circle of strong light which is sent from) a lamp whose beam can be directed Inside the theatre: ·...

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The Witch Trials in Salem

It was a folkloric belief that a Devil's Mark, like the brand on cattle, was placed upon a witch's skin by the devil to signify that this pact had been made. Witches were most often characterized as women. It was believed that a witch often joined a pact with the devil to gain powers to deal with infertility, immense fear for her children's well-being, or revenge against a lover. The long-term result of amalgamation of distinct types of magic-worker into one is the considerable present-day confusion as to what witches actually did, whether they harmed or healed, what role they had in the community, whether they can be identified with the "witches" of other cultures and even whether they existed as anything other than a projection. Present-day beliefs about the witches of history attribute to them elements of the folklore witch, the charmer, the cunning man or wise woman, the diviner and the astrologer. Powers typically attributed to European witches include turning food poisonous or inedible, flying on broomsticks or pitchforks, casting spells, cursing people, making livestock ill and crops fail, and creating fear and local chaos. Witch-hunts Among the Catholics, Protestants, and secularleadership of the European Late MedievalEarly Modern period (in the 14th and 18th century), fears about witchcraft rose to fever pitch, and sometimes led to large-scale witch-hunts, especially in Germanic Europe. Throughout this time, it was increasingly believed that Christianity was engaged in an apocalyptic battle against the Devil and his...

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The factors Estonian students consider important when choosing a job

To: Ms Johanson From: Mari Mets Subject: The factors Estonian students consider important when choosing a job Introduction The aim of this report is to analyse the results of two surveys into the information about which factors Estonian students consider important when choosing a job. The two surveys were carried out in 2005 and 2013. At the end of the report there are some possible reasons for the changes. Grow of importance To start with, the importance had grown 14% for the pay, 15% for the work atmosphere and 20% for worklife balance. The pay has stayed the same in the ranking of importance but the ranking of worklife balance has dropped from fourth to second place. Fall of importance In contrast, the importance of job security has fallen by 22% and job content by 16%. They used to be equally ranked the second, but now they have become the least important factors when choosing a job. Conclusion To sum up, the importance of the...

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London Eye

The entire structure is 135 metres (443 ft) tall and the wheel has a diameter of 120 metres It is the tallest Ferris wheel in Europe, and the most popular paid tourist attraction in the United Kingdom The London Eye is located at the western end of Jubilee Gardens, on the South Bank of the River Thames in the London Borough of Lambeth, between Westminster Bridge and Hungerford Bridge. Commonly known as the London Eye, or Millennium Wheel, formerly the Merlin Entertainments London Eye and before that, the British Airways London Eye. Since 20 January 2011, it has been officially known as the EDF Energy London Eye following a three- year sponsorship deal. The London Eye was formally opened by the then Prime Minister, Tony Blair, on 31 December 1999, although it was not opened to the public until 9 March 2000 because of technical problems. It took seven years and the skills of hundreds of people from five countries to make the London Eye a reality. Parts for the "Eye" were manufacture in many Countries including France, Germany, Italy, Holland, Czech Republic and of course the UK. The London Eye welcomes an average of 3.5 million customers every year. The London Eye can carry 800 passengers per revolution - equivalent to 11 London red doubled-Decker buses. Each of the 32 capsules weighs 10 tonnes. The total weight of the wheel and capsules is 2,100 tonnes Each rotation takes about 30 minutes, meaning a capsule travels at a stately 26cm per...

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English Myths and Legends

And Yet, we'll go, And me and thou No, nothing shows the way in rows. Catherine J. A Mermaid and a Magic Comb · Curry, Cornwall, England · 1700-1800 · Lost items by the beach · One old mad found a magical comb · Love, yet unhappiness · Decision to split up and therefore save humanity and the mermaids' world, too More mermaids... A Mummy's Tale · Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England · A Mummy caused quite a stink in Great Yarmouth · Valley of the Kings · Egypt A Ride with the Devil · Ranworth, Norfolk, England · 1770 · Colonel Thomas Sydney lived at the Old Hall, Ranworth in Norfolk · he was a bully and a drunkard who loved a bet · trouble that one gamble caused him A Saint's Revenge · Edmund of the East Angles · 855-1050 · Bury St. Edmun...

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Canada

Canada A Mari Usque Ad Mare Official language(s) English, French Inuktitut, Inuinnaqtun, Cree, Recognised regional languages Dëne Sliné, Gwich'in, Inuvialuktun, Slavey, Tlch Yatiì Languages in Canada North American country consisting of ten provinces and three territories located in the northern part of the continent, it extends from the Atlantic Ocean in the east to the Pacific Ocean in the west, and northward into the Arctic Ocean spanning over 9.9 million square kilometers, Canada is the world's second largest country by total area its common border with the United States is the longest land border in the world. Some facts The land that is now Canada was inhabited for millennia by various groups of Aboriginal peoples beginning in the late 15th century, British and French France ceded nearly...

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The House of Commons

The House of Commons Click to edit Master text styles Second level Third level Fourth level Fifth level The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which also comprises the Sovereign and the House of Lords. It consists of 650 elected members called Members of Parliament. The House of Commons was originally far less powerful than the House of Lords, but today its legislative powers greatly exceed those of the Lords. The full, formal style and title of the House of Commons is The Honourable the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled. Role The House of Commons main purpose is to make laws by passing Acts of Parliament, as well as to discuss current politi...

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