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The romantic movement in American literature (0)

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The Romantic movement in
American literature
Romanticism in literature
· Romantic
· Romanticism is an artistic, literary, and
intellectual movement
· Influenced by :
- Enlightenment
- elevated medievalism
· In America ­ 1820
Characteristic features
· Intuition, instincts, imagination, feelings
· Folk art, nature, heroism
· Protest against reality
· Emphasis on women and children
· Dreams
· Symbolism and myths
Events & Dates
· The American Revolution (1776 -1783)
· The French Revolution (1789 ­ 1799)
· The Industrial Revolution
· Civil war (1861 ­ 1865)
· Colonies, communes
· Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 ­ 1882)
· Henry David Thoreau (1817 ­ 1862)
Famous writers
· Small literary world, writers knew each other
· Washington Irving (1783 -1859)
· James Fenimore Cooper (1789 -1851)
· Nathaniel Hawthorne (1819 ­ 1891)
· Herman Melville (1819 -1891)
· Edgar Allan Poe (1809 -1840)
· Walt Whitman (1819 -1892)
· Emily Dickinson (1830 -1886)
Washington Irving &
James Fenimore Cooper
· American writers of the early 19th century
· Acclaim in Europe
· Irving's best known "Rip Van Winkle"
· J.F. Cooper's "Leatherstocking Tales"
· Cooper ­ American historical novel
Edgar Allan Poe
· January 19, 1809 ­ October 7, 1849
· American poet, short story writer, editor,
literary critic
· love, beauty and death
· Arabesque
· Horror, crime, detective fiction,
Poe's works
· Tale "The fall of the House of Usher"
· Tale "The Murders in the Rue Morgue"
· Tale "The Masque of Usher"
· Tale "Berenice"
· Poem "The Bells"
· Poem "The Raven"
· Poem "Annabel Lee"
Walt Whitman
· Full-name Walter Whitman
· May 31, 1819 ­ March 26, 1892
· American poet, essayist, journalist, and humanist
· His works have been translated into more than
twenty-five languages
· "Leaves of Grass"
· "Song of Myself"
· "Drum-Taps"
· "Memoranda During the War"
Emily Dickinson
· December 10, 1830 ­ May 15, 1886
· one of the two quintessential American poets of the 19th
century
· An introverted and hermetic life
· 1,789 poems
· Highly educated
· Amherst's most prominent family
· "Bolts of Melody:
New Poems of Emily Dickinson"
· Poems for Youth (1934, poetry)
· Love, nature, religion, morality
I died for beauty
I died for beauty but was scarce
Adjusted in the tomb,
When one who died for truth was lain
In an adjoining room.
He questioned softly why I failed?
"For beauty," I replied. "
And I for truth,--the two are one;
We brethren are," he said.
And so, as kinsmen met a night,
We talked between the rooms,
Until the moss had reached our lips,
And covered up our names.
References
· http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/372
· http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanticism
· http://www.wsu.edu:8001/~brians/hum_303/ro
· http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/me
· "American Literary Reader" by M. Kubre

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The Origins of American Literature

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American Literature

The making of a new nation. The Enlightenment in America. The emergence of the notion of the American Dream. The great Enlighteners: Crèvecoeur, Jefferson, Paine, Franklin. The American Enlightenment is the intellectual thriving period in the United States in the midtolate 18th century (1715­1789), especially as it relates to American Revolution on the one hand and the European Enlightenment on the other. Influenced by the scientific revolution of the 17th century and the humanist period during the Renaissance, the Enlightenment took scientific reasoning and applied it to human nature, society, and religion. American Enlightenment a gradual but powerful awakening that established the ideals of democracy, liberty, and religious tolerance in the people of America.

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Edgar A. Poe

He adapted very well to military discipline. Mr. Allan had him appointed to West Point Military Academy, but was dismissed. He married his 14-old cousin who had tuberculosis (lead to drinking). Two years after his wife´s death Poe himself was found in a Baltimore street near a polling place on an Election Day, died a few days later in hospital when he was only 40. · His works reflect the double aspect of his personality: the abandonment of the self-destructive romantic artist and the self-control of the conscious and conscientious craftsman, the passivity of the dreamer indifferent to all that exists outside his dream world and the restless activity of a keen mind always on the alert. · Poe himself classified his tales as "grotesque", "arabesque", "ratiocinative", to indicate variations in his intentions. The ,,arabesque" are those in which horror or other emotion in violent suspense

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English literature summary

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Victorian age

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